Posts Tagged ‘Caregiving’

Tips for Avoiding Elderly Heat Stroke & Exhaustion

Posted on: July 5th, 2017 by Jamie

I think it’s safe to say that summer has finally arrived here in Vermont and New Hampshire. Hot weather is dangerous, and seniors are particularly prone to its threat. Elderly heat stroke and heat exhaustion are a real problem. Please check on your older family, friends, and neighbors, especially if they do not have access to air conditioning. summer fan

There are several reasons for elderly heat vulnerability. People’s ability to notice changes in their body temperature decreases with age. Many seniors also have underlying health conditions that make them less able to adapt to heat. Furthermore, many medicines that seniors take can contribute to dehydration. Simple precautions are all that’s needed to keep safe. Here are some guidelines for keeping safe in hot weather:

  1. Drink Plenty of Liquids: Dehydration is the root of many heat related health problems. Drink plenty of water or juice, even if you’re not thirsty. But remember to avoid alcoholic or caffeinated drinks, as they can actually contribute to dehydration.
  2. Wear Appropriate Clothes: When it’s hot out, wear light-colored, lightweight, loose-fitting clothes and a wide-brimmed hat.
  3. Stay Indoors During Midday Hours: During periods of extreme heat, the best time to run errands or be outdoors is before 10 am or after 6 pm, when the temperature tends to be cooler.
  4. Take it Easy: Avoid exercise and strenuous activity, particularly outdoors, when it’s very hot out.
  5. Watch the Heat Index: When there’s a lot of moisture in their air (high humidity), the body’s ability to cool itself through sweating is impaired. The heat index factors humidity and temperature to approximate how the how the weather really feels. The current heat index can be found on all popular weather websites, and is also usually announced on local TV and radio weather reports during periods of warm weather.
  6. Seek Air-conditioned Environments: Seniors whose houses aren’t air-conditioned should consider finding an air-conditioned place to spend time during extreme heat. The mall, library or movie theater are all popular options. During heat waves, many cities also set up “cooling centers,” air-conditioned public places, for seniors and other vulnerable populations. Seniors without convenient access to any air-conditioned place might consider a cool bath or shower.
  7. Know the Warning Signs of Heat-related Illness: Dizziness, nausea, headache, rapid heartbeat, chest pain, fainting and breathing problems are all warning signs that help should be sought immediately.
  8. In addition to heat stroke, heat can kill by worsening existing chronic health conditions. For example, for the many Vermonters over the age of 65 who have a chronic condition—such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes—temperatures over 87°F can put them at a higher risk of life-threatening illness. People who feel unwell or faint in hot weather are also vulnerable to serious or deadly falls. People with chronic conditions may not show typical signs of heat illness, but rather worsened symptoms of their condition. If you or someone you know has a potentially dangerous chronic condition and begins to feel sick during a hot day, pay very close attention. If you have concerns about a person’s condition, dial 9-1-1 or get immediate medical attention.

Good Read for the Sandwich Generation

Posted on: May 5th, 2017 by Jamie

Good ReadAttention Sandwich Generation Members: If you need something to read while relaxing on this upcoming soggy spring Saturday and Sunday, I highly recommend Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant?  by Roz Chast It’s not new, it came out in 2014 and won lots of awards, but I finally got around to reading it. This memoir details the author’s journey with her parents aging, decline, moving and ultimately their passing.

The graphic novel style makes it an easy read. It is heartbreaking, funny, unflinchingly authentic, and relatable – if you are going or have gone through this with your own parents.

If you haven’t had conversations with your parents about the future, make it happen as real life won’t wait for you to do so. Planning is power – Good luck!

Good Read

Spotlight On Our Caregivers-Jillian

Posted on: February 8th, 2017 by Jamie

Spotlight-JillianArmistead Senior Care continues to shine a spotlight on our incredible Caregivers who give their hearts and souls to our clients each and every day. They are out in the community making a difference by sharing their compassion and skills in caring for our clients and allowing them to age in place. Today’s spotlight belongs to Jillian.

Although Jillian has only been with Armistead since June, she is a highly motivated young woman. She has recently earned her LNA license and has applied to enter nursing school this fall. Jillian comes from a family of nurses and ultimately, she would like to become a Certified Geriatric Nurse.

 

Jillian has strong family roots and deep connections with her extended family; respect and compassion were fostered from a young age. She fondly recalls spending Sundays with a beloved family member in her nineties.

 

Jillian was an important part of her Thetford Academy basketball team, culminating with the team winning the Vermont Division III State Championships in her senior year. With a love for sports and coaching, she enrolled at Coastal Carolina University to study Business and Sports Management. Ultimately, she decided that wasn’t for her and she returned home geared towards a new path.

 

Jillian loves to cook and bake, for both her family and her clients. She bakes a lot of muffins and scones for all and enjoys making stews and chowders. Jillian goes above and beyond for her clients; she incorporates servings for them when cooking at home. She loves arriving with food her clients especially like as it puts a smile on their faces, which in turn, puts a smile on Jillian’s.

 

When not cooking, baking, studying, walking with her two dogs, and Caregiving, Jillian also volunteers as a youth basketball coach. This season she will coach 5th and 6th grade boys on the school level plus 5th and 6th girls in the AAU basketball league.

 

Jillian really loves her job and her clients. She enjoys meeting people, hearing about their life experiences and learning from them. The most important qualities of a Caregiver according to Jillian are patience, understanding, and flexibility because every client is different and every day is different.

 

We are grateful for Jillian’s dedication and skill as an Armistead Caregiver. Thank you, Jillian!

Caregiver’s of the Year – 2016

Posted on: December 30th, 2016 by Jamie

Armistead Senior Care is proud to announce the Caregiver’s of the Year for 2016.

Please join us in recognizing Karey Young as the 2016 Vermont Caregiver of the Year and Dee Druge as the 2016 New Hampshire Caregiver of the Year. We are very grateful for their skill, compassion, and dedication as Armistead Caregiver’s.

 

Caregiver of the YearCaregiver of the Year

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank You and Congratulations to Karey and Dee!

Spotlight on Our Caregivers-Maria

Posted on: November 29th, 2016 by Jamie

caregiver heartArmistead Senior Care would like to shine a spotlight on our incredible Caregivers who give their hearts and souls to our clients each and every day.

 

Maria has been with Armistead since 2014 and feels that the most important qualities of a Caregiver are patience, empathy, and respect. She exhibits all of these important qualities while meeting and developing relationships with her clients-learning about their lives, providing assistance to them and honoring who they are now.

 
Her father was in the United States Information Agency, therefore Maria and her siblings grew up in such places as Thailand, Germany, and Iceland. She graduated from high school in Tokyo, Japan. In the U.S., Maria has lived in Boston, MA and on the Hawaiian Island of Oahu. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park where she graduated with a degree in Dance.

 
After college, Maria used her degree at the Kids Moving Company in Bethesda, Maryland. Her focus was on creative movement, motor development and dance with children two to 12 years of age. Maria has also been a Para Educator/Reading Tutor in elementary through high school settings. She has also worked with the developmentally disabled using visual motor integration.

 
Maria is currently enrolled in the Master of Science Program in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (PCMH) through Southern New Hampshire University. Ultimately, she is interested in helping people living through trauma.

 
In addition to her Caregiving with Armistead and her schoolwork, Maria is a volunteer with the Vermont chapter of NAMI, National Alliance on Mental Illness where she helps run support groups and trains new facilitators.

 
During her limited free time, Maria enjoys walking and doing yoga for her mind and body. She carves time out of her busy schedule to spend time with special friends and family. Maria and her husband are grateful their son, a UVM graduate student in Applied Math and daughter, a Biochemistry major at Norwich University are still living at home, at least for the time being.

 

spotlight on our Caregiver's
We wish Maria all the best with her studies; we know she will make an excellent Counselor. For now, we are very lucky to have her and we are grateful for Maria’s dedication, skill and compassion as an Armistead Caregiver.

 

Thank you Maria!

 

 
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